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So far Joyce Cimbalista has created 29 entries.

Getting the URL for Google+ Reviews for Your Business

I like to give my clients the link to the Reviews page of their Google+ profile so they can easily give it to clients to write those valuable Google reviews. Sometimes I will create a page on their website with links to their business listings so they can give clients the link to the page and then the client can post their review in one or more places.

On your phone, go to Google.com and search for the business name as it appears in their Google+ listing.

When the Google+ listing appears, touch the blue circle to display more of the listing. Scroll down to Rate and Review section, tap the 5th star and then copy the url. Paste it into an email and send it to yourself.

That’s it!

Site Not Found After Installing WordPress in Subdomain

I installed WordPress in a subdomain so I could develop a new site, however, when visiting the new URL, I got a site not found error. Called tech support, and found out that the main domain’s DNS was the cause. For this particular domain, the email is hosted elsewhere. All I had to do was add an “A” record to the domain’s DNS with a value equal to the name of the subdomain, in this case “preview” and with the IP address of the domain.

Nice Tool for Website Responsiveness

On occasion, I will be working on a WordPress website using a responsive template, but have a need for a three-column page. Rather than use a table, I use a tool called the Responsive Grid System. As it says on the website, it’s not a framework or a boilerplate, and it works on anywhere from a two to a twelve column layout. It’s got examples of HTML and CSS code that plugs right in to your existing code. Check it out!

Not Receiving Emails from a WordPress Contact Form

This happens frequently – you install Contact Form 7 or Fast Secure Contact Form plugin on your WordPress site and emails sent through it just never arrive in the Inbox. Sometimes this can be due to the settings in the form, such as

Sometimes it can be due to an incorrect setting on the host. The cPanel MX Entry is set to Local Mail Exchanger by default but should be set to Remote Mail Exchanger. This means that if a form in your website uses email@yourdomain.com and it’s the same as your website, the web server will attempt to handle the email itself (because it also hosts your site). To solve the problem, change the setting in cPanel to Remote Mail Exchanger which will tell the server to use the MX records to route the email. This problem can occur with any host that uses cPanel including GoDaddy, HostGator, etc. In GoDaddy, this setting can be found under Hosting > Manage > Email > MX Entry. You may also need to add an MX record with priority 10 and remove, if any, an MX record with priority 0.

Finding Previous DNS Settings for a Domain

So the other day I was setting up forwarding for some domains and accidentally forwarded one that I didn’t want forwarded. When I unset the forwarding, the domain reverted back to the default settings and not the settings that it was previously set to. I recall once in the past when this happened, and GoDaddy tech support had said they keep no records of previous DNS settings for domains. Knowing that Google stores cached pages, I wondered if there was anything similar for DNS settings. I searched, and sure enough, there were a couple sites that keep previous DNS settings for domains. All you have to do is type in the domain name, and it comes up with results.

Here are two that I used: http://dnshistory.org/ and http://whoisrequest.org/history/

How to Make a Slideshow Video for YouTube

Start Windows MovieMaker.

Click ‘Add Videos and Photos’

Re-arrange photos, add music, add transitions, etc.

Click Save Movie – for High Definition Display.

Go to YouTube and upload movie.

Allowed Memory Size Exhausted

I started getting the following errors on the frontend of a WordPress site:

Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 67108864 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 12288 bytes) in /home/aginginoudoun/public_html/wp-admin/includes/theme.php on line 523
Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 67108864 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 3072 bytes) in /home/aginginoudoun/public_html/wp-content/plugins/sabai/lib/Sabai/Addon/System/Model/Base/AddonGateway.php on line 81

A Google search indicated that the software was reaching a PHP memory limit, so I ran a phpinfo.php and saw that both local and master memory was 64M. Further reading advised creating a .user.ini file, put the following line in it: memory_limit = 256M, and place the file in the public_html folder. So I did this, and ran phpinfo again and saw that local memory was now 256M and master was still 64M. Supposedly the local overrides the master value.

Tested the website again, and no more fatal errors!

P.S. Don’t forget to remove your phpinfo.php file from the site.

Moving WordPress Development Site to ‘Live’ Site

I just recently moved a WordPress site I’ve been developing using a different domain name to its final destination as a ‘live’ site. I’ve done this several times before but this time I wanted to document the process for future reference.

The development site is sdspreview.com. The current site is named 3dogfarm.com and is an HTML site. The two sites are both on GoDaddy but under different accounts.

Here is the process I used:

On Development Site –

  • Bring up to date all plugins, etc.
  • Install the Go Live Update urls plugin
  • Go to Settings > general and change wordpress address and site address to 3dogfarm.com

Log in to hosting for sdspreview.com
Go to root directory for the site, select all files and Archive into zip file.

Download zip file to my PC

Go to PHPMYADMIN and export database to PC.

Go to hosting where WordPress site will be. Install WordPress in root folder.

Locate WordPress database that was just created. Import the database that was exported to PC.

Upload zip file to root folder.

Extract zipped file to root folder.

Go to Databases and find out the database name, username, password, and MySQL host name.

Go to root and edit wp-config.php – update the database name, username, password, and MySQL host name.

Log into the site – reset password if you’ve forgotten it.

Run the Go Live Update URLs plugin to change any lingering occurrences of the old url.

Review any widgets to ensure no old urls are there.

Enter Google Analytics code and set search engines to allow indexing.

Done!

 

2015 Constant Contact All Star

Received an email from Constant Contact today:

“Last year, your efforts to manage your clients’ accounts and engage with their customers were exemplary. Stellar. We certainly noticed. So we are thrilled to name you to our roster of 2015 All Stars based on your performance.

This annual designation is something that only 10% of Constant Contact customers receive for their excellence in building better customer relationships.

Relationships matter to us at Constant Contact. Thanks for making yours count. Congratulations again, and we hope you have another great year in 2016.Constant Contact 2015 All Star Winner

Diagnosing Connection Timed Out for Certain Websites

I was working on an existing website one day, and the next day, I get Connection Timed Out errors while trying to view the site. I could view other sites just fine. It seemed to be just this one site.

After some research, it appeared that some IP addresses may have become blocked in my area, so I first needed to find the IP address of the site that I’m unable to reach. Do this by visiting https://cachecheck.opendns.com/ and enter in the domain. Next, using the Command prompt run in administrator mode, ping the domain.

Long story short, I ended up using tracert plus some other in-depth network tools and was eventually able to show the site owner that my request was being rejected at his server, upon which he found that my IP had been blocked on that server. Problem solved!